Why Teachers Make Great Entrepreneurs

teacher entrepreneur

I never in a million years would have ever thought I would end up as an entrepreneur.  At the age of 4, when my mom stumbled upon me teaching stuffed animals, I told her I was going to be a teacher some day.  That is when it all began.  I knew then that I had a gift to help and teach others. 

I centered my whole life around preparing to be a teacher.  I acquired a bachelors degree, 4 teacher certifications, and a masters degree.  I taught for 10 years.  But then there was a sudden shift.  Policies were changing, the level of commitment was changing, and my family was changing.  Having children and balancing the workload of an elementary teacher is not something I thought about.  I didn't think it would be a challenge.  You can read more about my story here.

And of course you should definitely join my facebook group for female entrepreneurs: Dream Builder Teachers.


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A GUIDE FOR TEACHERS

Teachers sometimes play small because they don't think they have the knowledge or skills to do something other than teaching.  The truth is teachers have so many hidden talents and skills they don't even realize they have.  Here are 10 reasons why teachers make great entrepreneurs:

1.  They went into teaching to impact others.

I went into teaching to make an impact on others.  I knew I had gifts and talents that I could share with children.  Just a few days ago I received 2 letters in the mail from 2 students I had in my class 4 years ago!  They were writing and telling me how special I was to them and how I impacted them.  I haven't been in the classroom for 3 years.  How special is that?  However, through my business I impact hundreds of lives every day.  Yes I said that right---hundreds!  There are women who have finally been able to gain clarity in their lives & business through my coaching.  There are women who for the first time feel like they are finally right where they belong.  There are also women who are ready to chase their dreams and just needed someone to give them permission and show them the way.

2. Teachers are great multi-taskers.

Sharpening a pencil, loading a document on the smartboard, and answering a child's question at the same time?  Teachers multi-task all day long.  Being an online at-home entrepreneur I've had to learn how to multi-task a lot.  I've had to learn how to do different tasks together: fold laundry & listen to training, listen to a podcast & create graphics, listen to a client on the phone & take notes.

3. Teachers know how to communicate.

They know how to present information: how to vary their voice, be animated, etc.  Teachers can give information in the right form and at the right length to people so they understand and can take action.  Successful business owners know how to communicate to their audience.

4.  Teachers are great at leveraging resources.

Teachers have to be super resourceful.  I used to have to dig and find the perfect bookshelves, organizers, pens, post-it notes, etc.  Many times I acquired used office equipment from businesses that were throwing things away since the education budget is small.  A business owner has to  be constantly learning and gathering resources to keep their business running smoothly.

5.  Teachers know how to adjust their instruction based on who they are talking to.

Teachers can look at the age level of kids, what subject area they are teaching and know almost immediately what the child needs in order to learn.  Differentiated instruction anyone??  Same thing goes for a business.  Online business owners decide what their clients and customers wants and needs are and need to know how to adjust their digital products to meet their needs.

6. Teachers know how to evaluate and do something different when something doesn't go right.

Teachers have that innate ability to evaluate when something isn't working or going right and do something else.  Entrepreneurs evaluate and analyze their business often.  It is one of the most beneficial practices of an entrepreneur.  Knowing when to change a few things, add to their products, or ditch something that didn't work is important for business owners to keep up momentum.

7.  Teachers create products for what their students need.

I spent hours & YEARS creating my own things based on the needs of my students.  I was able to look at the objective of what they needed to learn, their ability level, and their interests to create something.  Same thing goes for entrepreneurs.  They create products based around their client or customers needs.  Knowing their ideal client or customer is a essential part of having a successful business.

8.  Teachers think outside the box.

Teachers look at the systematic approach and think how they can do things differently to make the biggest impact.  I don't know about you, but I need a framework/structure/lesson plan to follow and then I can put my own spin on it.  Same thing goes for a successful business owner.  They think outside the box to create products that solve problems for the customers and clients.

9. Teachers know slow and steady progress makes things possible.  

Teachers can see the end result at the end of the school year and know they can bring the kids to that direction with slow and steady progress.  Entrepreneurs have an end goal in mind and work hard to thrive towards that goal.  Teachers and entrepreneurs have to trust the process!

10. Teachers add passion into everything they do. 

I saw and worked with the most passionate teachers in my teaching career.  There were always teachers at school in the evening on weekends.  They were passionate about what they were doing and are willing to put in the time and effort.  Successful entrepreneurs are passionate about their business.  They put passion into developing products that clients and customers need and live off the impact they make.

Are you curious how you can make an income and impact through an online business? DOWNLOAD THE 10 STEP GUIDE FOR TEACHERS HERE

teacher entrepreneurship
Kristin Maahs